Modern Vax Short Education

Most modern vaccines are made in China 🇨🇳. There are two cultured human cells in nearly all live vaccines, from a boy and a girl. They are not Adam and Eve.

You need to sit down now. If necessary grab a brown bag. Education begins.

The package insert for Varivax, a chickenpox vaccine, states that the vaccine contains “residual components of MRC-5 cells including DNA and protein”, but how many parents or grandparents, let alone pediatricians and pharmacists, would know that MRC-5, or WI-38, is a cell line derived from an aborted fetus going back to Britain 🇬🇧 — Dr. Theresa A. Deisher

Cell line is a general term that applies to a defined population of cells that can be maintained in culture for an extended period of time, retaining stability of certain phenotypes and functions. Cell lines are usually clonal, meaning that the entire population originated from a single common ancestor cell.

What is a diploid?

Humans have 46 chromosomes in each diploid cell. Among those, there are two sex-determining chromosomes, and 22 pairs of autosomal, or non-sex, chromosomes. The total number of chromosomes in diploid cells is described as 2n, which is twice the number of chromosomes in a haploid cell (n).

Diploid is a cell or organism that has paired chromosomes, one from each parent.  Human sex cells (egg and sperm cells) contain a single set of chromosomes and are known as haploid.

In other words each vial 🧪 of vaccine has what it takes to clone a boy or a girl with the two aborted hosts’ cell lines from 1960’s.

MRC5 (Medical Research Council cell strain 5) is a diploid human cell culture line composed of fibroblasts, originally developed from research deriving lung tissue of a 14-week-old aborted Caucasian male fetus from 1966.

The WI-38 cell line and one other cell line, MRC-5, created in 1966 from the lungs of an aborted fetus (known as MRC5, after Britain’s Medical Research Council) are available in such quantity that there’s not a need to go on deriving new fetal cell lines.

A vaccine with a live virus needs a human cell to thrive, that is what the RNA does. The virus RNA clings on the human cell.

China is currently producing nearly all of the commonly-used vaccines for viral diseases such as influenza, measles, rabies (for humans), mumps, rotavirus, hepatitis A and B and for bacterial diseases, including typhoid, tetanus and diphtheria,” says Dr Xu Ming, Vice President of the China Chamber of Commerce.

The fetal embryo fibroblast cells used to grow vaccine viruses were first obtained from elective (free will) termination of two pregnancies in the 1960s. These same embryonic cells obtained from the  1960s have continued to grow in the laboratory in multiple locations and are used to make many vaccines today.

The WI38 cell line is used as a culture to grow live viruses that are used in vaccines. “Merck, as well as other vaccine manufacturers, uses two well-established human cell lines to grow the virus for selected vaccines,” Merck releases.

WI-38 is a diploid human cell line composed of fibroblasts derived from lung tissue of a 3-month-gestation aborted female fetus. 

The contributions from this cell line towards human virus vaccine production have been credited with avoiding disease in, or saving the lives of people who are inoculated by them.

Why do vaccines include a human cell? The human cells make a “host” for the virus 🦠 , like a parasite, to carry it over from the vial 🧪 to the person’s bloodstream without sticking to the vial or the needle.

GSK’s varicella vaccine contains human serum albumin (HSA) which is used to stabilize the virus and prevent immunogens from adhering to the injection vial walls. However, because HSA is derived from human blood, there is a theoretical risk that it might contain infectious agents which could be unsafe for humans.

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